Wendy Tackles the Sponge

Umm, the cake.  I’m talking about the cake.  Why? What did you think I was talking about?  (chuckle chuckle)

I have long wanted to try my hand at a Victoria Sponge.  First, because I brake for cake.  Second, it is just so quintessentially English (although it is common to find this cake at eateries in Scotland as well).  It’s strange, but in all the times I have dined in Scotland, I never once ordered a slice of Victoria Sponge.  We’re going to remedy that today.

I researched several different recipes and it seems that each are pretty consistent, with just some minor variations among them.  Equal parts butter, sugar, and flour seems to be the common thread.  For my cake today, I decided to try a recipe by BBC Good Food (I chose a different mixing method and also chose a different filling).

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1997/classic-victoria-sandwich

Let’s get baking!

Step 1:  Set your oven and gather your ingredients

20171111_181119

Preheat oven to 190°C/ 375°F

*In this recipe, the sugar, butter, and flour are measured in grams.  I used a good kitchen scale to get precise measurements.

For the cake:

200 g caster sugar

200 g butter at room temperature

4 eggs, beaten and at room temperature

200 g self-rising flour

1 tsp. baking powder

2 Tbsp milk

For the filling:

1 C heavy whipping cream

1/4 tsp. vanilla extract

Your favorite jam

For the top of cake:

Confectioner’s/powdered sugar

Also known as a Victoria Sandwich or a Victorian Cake, the Victorian Sponge became popular during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901).

Step 2: Prepare your pans

Grease the bottom and sides of two 8″ round cake pans with butter.  Cover the bottom of each with a circle of oven proof/nonstick parchment paper.

20171111_181007

Step 3:  Mix together ingredients

In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to combine caster sugar and butter (which should be at room temperature).

Beat in each egg one at a time.  Eggs should be at room temperature in order to prevent curdling of the sponge mixture.

Next, mix in the flour and baking powder.

Add the milk.

Beat the ingredients together until you have a smooth, soft batter.

20171111_180852

Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788-1861) and one of Queen Victoria’s ladies-in-waiting, is credited as the inventor of tea time.

Step 4:  Fill pans

Divide the mixture evenly between the two cake pans, smoothing the surface with a knife or spoon.

20171111_180649

Step 5:  Bake

Bake the cakes at 375° for 20 minutes.  Cakes are done when they spring to the touch and when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.  Cool on a cooling rack for 10 minutes.

20171111_180535

Step 6:  Turn out cakes

After cakes have cooled on a rack for 10 minutes, turn cakes out onto a sheet of parchment or other non-stick surface.  Gently peel off the parchment circles. Continue to cool completely.

20171111_180414

Even though the Victoria Sponge originated in England, you will find it served in coffee shops, tea rooms, and bakeries throughout Scotland.

Step 7:  Prepare cream filling

Beat 1 C heavy whipping cream and 1/4 tsp vanilla extract until you have whipped cream (I used our trusty Ninja but a hand mixer would work well too).

20171111_180247

Step 8:  Fill and prepare

Take one of the cakes (bottom side facing up) and evenly spread a layer of your favorite jam.  *I used Stonewall Kitchen-Black Raspberry Jam…my favorite!

Gently spread the whipped cream over the jam.  Top with the second cake (top side facing up).  Dust the top of cake with confectioner’s/powdered sugar.

Step 9:  Make a pot of tea, set a pretty table, and enjoy!

20171111_180122

20171111_175924

So, what is my final verdict on the Victoria Sponge?

Oh. My. Goodness.

Delicious!  Definitely sponge worthy (sorry, couldn’t resist).

This cake is simple and quick to make, the texture is moist, light, and airy, and it isn’t overly sweet.  I’m really glad that I chose to make a whipped cream filling instead of the heavier sugar and butter filling.  It far exceeded my expectations.  Mr. C enthusiastically approved as well!

If you want to impress your friends and family, definitely make this gorgeous cake.  If you decide to make it, leave me a comment and let me know how it went.

20171111_175756

Happy baking!

Cheers,

20170929_090548

13 thoughts on “Wendy Tackles the Sponge

  1. Wendy, that looks a superb sponge! I’ve never associated it with Scotland particularly, always thought of it as quintessentially English, so it’s good to know of it’s popularity further north. A simple recipe and so delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. By the look of your photos I would love to take tea at your house. That sponge cake is superb, it looks so light and fluffy. Victoria sponge is a cake I make quite often because it’s so easy, but I don’t usually use as much sugar and fat as the recipes say. I also don’t put cream in with the jam in the middle, although it does taste wonderful that way. My only gripe about Victoria sponge is that it doesn’t keep particularly well, but if you can eat it all in a day or two that’s no problem. My mouth’s watering looking at that close-up of the cake….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Lorna. 🙂 You are the tearoom expert. I hope I got all my facts correct! I actually thought this recipe kept quite well. I kept in in the fridge. I was afraid the cake would get soggy from the filling but by the third day it was still fine. It looks like such fancy cake but was so easy to put together. Win win!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s