Lens-Artists Challenge #75: Nostalgic

Hello all! I hope you are having/have had a terrific Tuesday.

This week’s photo challenge comes from Tina. She has encouraged us to depict something that evokes nostalgia. For my offering, I have chosen to highlight a few photos taken at Lauriston Castle in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Last November, I wrote a post showcasing the beautiful Edwardian interior of Lauriston Castle and also included a little bit about its history. If you are interested in taking a look, you can get to it by clicking here. The photos from that post are in color, but for today’s purposes, I have had a little fun transforming a few of those photos into a more vintage look.

The castle was left to the city of Edinburgh upon the death of its last owner, Mrs. Reid, in 1926 and the interior remains today exactly as it was on the day she passed. I hope these photos evoke a sense of nostalgia and give life to how Lauriston would have looked in photos in Mrs. Reid’s day.

Thanks for stopping by, friends. If you would like to participate in this week’s challenge, please click here.

Take care!

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #74: Abstract

This week Patti has challenged us to “break the rules and go beyond the traditional realistic image of an object, scene, or element” to post a picture of something abstract. I immediately thought of these photos, taken at Elgin Cathedral in Elgin, Moray in the northeast part of Scotland.

This is the beautiful vaulted ceiling and column in the cathedral’s Chapter House, an octagonal room in which cathedral clergy met daily to discuss business. The Chapter House was built in the early 13th century and remodeled in the late 1400’s.

Have a great week, everyone!

If you would like to join in on the weekly challenges, click here.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #73: Cold

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge comes from Tina. She has challenged us to depict cold.

I chose this photo of Loch Tay in Scotland. Fifteen miles long, a mile wide, and around five-hundred feet deep, Loch Tay lies in the valley between the villages of Kenmore and Killin. The area has a rich history from the Iron Age when ancient people lived on the loch on man-made islands called crannogs.

Beautiful at any time of the year, there is something extra lovely about Loch Tay when clothed in white.

Loch Tay covered in snow.

Wishing each of you a happy week!

xo,

If you would like to join in the fun of the weekly challenges, click here.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72: Waiting

Whisky. Uisga Beatha. Water of Life.

By law, Scotch (that is, whisky without the ‘e’) must be aged in oak barrels in Scotland for a minimum of three years. Most premium distillers, however, mature their whisky for much longer (8, 10, 12, 15 years, etc.). Many of the casks that are used to age Scotch are imported from America and Europe and have previously held wine, bourbon, port, and sherry. Each cask lends its own distinctive flavors and color to the finished product. It is indeed a long process, but believe me, for the distillers and those of us who reap the benefits of their labor…

…it is worth waiting for.

To be a part of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, click here.  Thank you, Amy, for this week’s challenge!

Cheers!