Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Red

Hello, friends. I hope everyone has had a nice weekend so far. They go so fast, don’t they?

This week’s photo challenge has us seeing red. Patti has tasked us with sharing photos that feature this “emotional, fiery, and sensual” color. To make the challenge a little more difficult for myself, I chose (with the exception of one) to find photos where red is not the dominant hue in the scene, but rather a splash of bright color to which the eye is drawn. Here’s what I came up with.

Britain’s iconic red telephone boxes provide a pop of color and cheer on an otherwise drab day.

The Royal Mile in Edinburgh’s Old Town.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Leading Lines

Hello there, friends. Is everyone having a good day?

It’s photo challenge time again and this week it comes from Tina at Travels and Trifles. Tina has challenged us to post photos with ‘leading lines’. A compositional element of photography, “leading lines carry our eye through a photograph. They help to tell a story, to place emphasis, and to draw a connection between objects. They create a visual journey from one part of an image to another and can be helpful for creating depth as well.” – Tina

I really had a good time with this one. I don’t know if I got it right in every photo, but it definitely challenged me and allowed me to look at my photos in a different light. Hope you enjoy my offerings for this week.

Possibly my favorite photo that I took on our last trip, this shot was snapped on the grounds at Rait Castle, located near Inverness, Scotland.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

Hi everyone,

For the first photo challenge of 2020, Leya has asked us to share a special spot shot; that is, a place that we, individually, regard as special. I could actually argue that my entire blog fits that category, haha! Scotland is, after all, my heart and soul. I decided today, though, to step out of the Scottish box and share with you another place that is really meaningful to me. It’s a place that I wish I could visit much more often, but when I do have the chance, I never feel more relaxed or in awe of God’s majesty.

I am speaking of the Florida Panhandle. Specifically, the area dubbed the Emerald Coast, a one-hundred mile stretch of pristine beaches along the Gulf of Mexico. Renowned for its emerald green waters and white-as-snow beaches, I think it is one of the prettiest places on earth.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Nostalgic

Hello all! I hope you are having/have had a terrific Tuesday.

This week’s photo challenge comes from Tina. She has encouraged us to depict something that evokes nostalgia. For my offering, I have chosen to highlight a few photos taken at Lauriston Castle in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Abstract

This week Patti has challenged us to “break the rules and go beyond the traditional realistic image of an object, scene, or element” to post a picture of something abstract. I immediately thought of these photos, taken at Elgin Cathedral in Elgin, Moray in the northeast part of Scotland.

This is the beautiful vaulted ceiling and column in the cathedral’s Chapter House, an octagonal room in which cathedral clergy met daily to discuss business. The Chapter House was built in the early 13th century and remodeled in the late 1400’s.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Cold

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge comes from Tina. She has challenged us to depict cold.

I chose this photo of Loch Tay in Scotland. Fifteen miles long, a mile wide, and around five-hundred feet deep, Loch Tay lies in the valley between the villages of Kenmore and Killin. The area has a rich history from the Iron Age when ancient people lived on the loch on man-made islands called crannogs.

Beautiful at any time of the year, there is something extra lovely about Loch Tay when clothed in white.

Loch Tay covered in snow.

Wishing each of you a happy week!

xo,

If you would like to join in the fun of the weekly challenges, click here.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Waiting

Whisky. Uisga Beatha. Water of Life.

By law, Scotch (that is, whisky without the ‘e’) must be aged in oak barrels in Scotland for a minimum of three years. Most premium distillers, however, mature their whisky for much longer (8, 10, 12, 15 years, etc.). Many of the casks that are used to age Scotch are imported from America and Europe and have previously held wine, bourbon, port, and sherry. Each cask lends its own distinctive flavors and color to the finished product. It is indeed a long process, but believe me, for the distillers and those of us who reap the benefits of their labor…

…it is worth waiting for.

To be a part of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, click here.  Thank you, Amy, for this week’s challenge!

Cheers!