Parks and Rec Made Me Cry So I Booked a Trip to Scotland

Hey there, Friends!  Good to see you again.

In typical fashion, Mr. C and I were late to the game.  A few weeks ago on a lazy vacation day in Kentucky, we discovered the comedy series “Parks and Recreation” produced by and starring Amy Poehler.  Never mind that the show ended like three and a half years ago, but hey.  We’re not big television watchers and it takes a lot in a show to impress me and hold my attention, but boy when I find a show that does both, I’m ALL in.  Smart, witty, hilarious, and occasionally quite poignant and touching, I think “Parks and Rec” knocked it out of said park.

The show’s characters are an extremely eclectic bunch and I get such a kick out of them all!  But it’s Ron Swanson – that deadpan, highly private, masculine, meat-eating, whisky-loving, mustache of a man who I adore the most.

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Ron Swanson, played by Nick Offerman

In direct contrast to Poehler’s character Leslie Knope who is perpetually sunny, optimistic, extroverted, hardworking, and a staunch believer in big government, Ron is distant and reclusive, he seldom expresses emotion (although he occasionally gets the giggles), and is a libertarian who believes strongly in small government.  Despite these traits and claiming that he has no interest in the personal lives of those around him, Ron actually cares a great deal for his colleagues and often helps them in spite of himself.  In particular, he has a deep and profound respect and affection for Leslie.

In Season Six, the cast goes to London and begrudgingly, Ron tags along.  His new bride Diane was supposed to have accompanied him as a honeymoon of sorts but she gets terrible morning sickness and stays home.  She insists that Ron go anyway so he can take pictures for her.  Because his “love for Diane trumps his hatred for Europe” (remember, libertarian), he goes with the group even though he makes it clear in that deadpan voice of his that, “All of this could have been avoided if we’d followed my plan for a honeymoon.  A steak dinner, a glass of Lagavulin whisky, then vigorous lovemaking for two hours, and we’re both asleep by 8:30.”

God, I love this show.

So, you’re probably wondering why in the world the show made me cry.  Well.

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Happy Valentine’s Day

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A Red, Red Rose

-by Robert Burns (1759-96)

O my Luve’s like a red, red rose,
That’s newly sprung in June:
O my Luve’s like the melodie
That’s sweetly play’d in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonie lass,
So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a’ the seas gang dry.

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o’ life shall run.

And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve!
And fare-thee-weel, a while!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho’ ’twere ten thousand mile!

 

Happy Valentine’s Day to each of you today!

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*Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

The Bard of Ayrshire: Robert Burns

Welcome back! I hope everyone is having a terrific week.

Today I would like to pick up where I left off in my previous post about Scottish poet Robert Burns and the annual Burns Night celebration. I promised you I would go a little deeper into the life of the man who penned ‘Auld Lang Syne’ and who some 222 years later, is regarded as the national poet of Scotland. So let’s dig in!

Ol’ Rabbie was a handsome chap, eh?

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The eldest of seven children, Robert Burns was born on January 25, 1759 in a small town in Ayrshire, Scotland. His father, William Burnes (the family later dropped the ‘e’), and mother, Agnes Brown, were poor tenant farmers. Because of their impoverished situation, young Robert’s formative years were spent engaged in hard, manual labor on the family farm. This facet of his life would shape his world view and inform his writing throughout the years.

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Burns Night

Greetings Readers,

Today is a big day in Scotland and for those of Scots descent around the world.  For today is January 25, the birthday of Scotland’s beloved national poet, Robert Burns.

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Photo:  Public Domain

Also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns (my personal favorite), The Ploughman Poet, and the Bard of Ayrshire, Burns is one of Scotland’s most celebrated sons.  You may know him best as the man who first penned the words to ‘Auld Lang Syne‘.  And I’m sure you have heard the poetic verse: “O my Luve’s like a red, red rose that’s newly sprung in June”.  Perhaps you are familiar with Burns’ narrative poem, ‘Tam O’ Shanter’.  Or, maybe you have a fondness for one of Rabbie’s other 713 works (possibly more?), which range in topic from death and war, anguish and greed, from religion and politics, to love and sex (and many other topics in between).  There is certainly no shortage to choose from.  *Although archived and no longer updated, I discovered a BBC page dedicated to Burns that lists 716 poems and songs.  It allows you to search for works by title, season, theme, and year written.  Well worth a look if you are at all interested in Rabbie’s poetry.

Every January 25, Robert Burns is celebrated with the annual Burns Night Supper.  I have never had the good fortune to take part, but oh how I would love to!

So, what does a Burns Supper involve? Fun, I would imagine!

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For Auld Lang Syne

Happy New Year, Friends!

Wow, I simply cannot believe 2018 is almost here.  In less than 48 hours, the first of you will celebrate the strike of midnight and the rest of us will follow as the waves of time roll across the dark, deep sea.

A new year.  A new beginning.  A fresh start.  A blank page beckoning to be written upon.  What will you write on your page this year?

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In my great love affair with Scotland, I learned something that I would like to share with you.  If I were to quiz you on the name of the song sung on New Year’s Eve the world over, you would probably tell me it’s ‘Auld Lang Syne’.  And you would be correct.  But does anyone (aside from our awesome friends-the Brits) know to whom the song is attributed?  I never really gave it much thought, but how strange that so many of us across the globe ring in the new year singing the exact same tune and yet the majority of us likely do not know where it originated or even understand what the words are all about.  It reminds me of the humorous dialogue exchange between Billy Crystal’s and Meg Ryan’s characters at the end of one of my favorite movies, ‘When Harry Met Sally’.


Harry: [about Auld Lang Syne] What does this song mean? My whole life, I don’t know what this song means. I mean, ‘Should old acquaintance be forgot’? Does that mean that we should forget old acquaintances, or does it mean if we happened to forget them, we should remember them, which is not possible because we already forgot?

Sally: Well, maybe it just means that we should remember that we forgot them or something. Anyway, it’s about old friends.

-from ‘When Harry Met Sally’, 1989


Roughly translated “for old times’ sake” or “days gone by”, ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is nothing if not all about preserving old friendships, raising a glass, and looking back with nostalgia over the events of the year.  It is a song steeped in sentimentality that has the power to momentarily bind us together in remembrance, in the celebration of the moment, and in hope for the future.  Joy, kinship and comaraderie…even melancholy and regret…these are just a few of the feelings I think this song has the power to invoke.  Thus is the great power of music.

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I challenge you to replace the words ‘auld lang syne’ with ‘for old times’ sake’ when you read the lyrics (bottom of post).  It will take on a brand new meaning.

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