Elie, Scotland

Hi, Friends!  I’m so glad you stopped by today.  Hope you are having a lovely weekend.

I have been reflecting back on a few of the Scottish villages that Mr. C and I only saw a peek of but that someday deserve a second look.  Elie is one of those places.  I can’t help but feel that we somehow missed the boat on this one.

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Located on the Firth of Forth in the East Neuk of Fife, Elie is a popular and picturesque seaside village that was established in the 16th century.  It became a Burgh of Barony in 1589 and as such, was under the control of the Lairds of Ardross – landowners who held their estates directly from The Crown.  The Lairds were in control of the town council and court and therefore, the villagers were dependent upon these men in matters of trade.  (Burghs were abolished in 1975.)

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Enchanting Crail

Greetings everyone,

How do you spell the word enchanting?  That’s easy.

C R A I L.

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Wouldn’t you agree?  I would say that Crail is my imagination come to life, but actually it was my jigsaw puzzle that came to life!

20171119_170010Just ninety miles to the northeast of Edinburgh, Scotland where the Firth of Forth and the North Sea meet, lies the picturesque, historic fishing village of Crail.  Several of these old, charming fishing villages dot the coastline along this northeast corner of the Kingdom of Fife.  In my opinion, Crail is one of the prettiest.  Once a hub for the export of such commodities as fish, salt, mutton, and wool to mainland Europe, Crail Harbor still maintains itself in small capacity as a working harbor today, well-known for its fresh shellfish.

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Off the Beaten Path: Newark Castle

My husband has always been fascinated with castles.  From the earliest years of our marriage he possessed large picture books about castles, movies that take place in the age of castles, role playing games where the quests led to castles, and Legos that he would design and construct into crazy, massive, elaborate castles (yep, he’s kind of a nerd).  And although I thought castles were interesting, I could never quite grasp what all the fuss was about.

And then I went to Scotland.

Most tourists only ever visit Scotland’s “biggies”-Dunnottar, Stirling, Eileen Donan, etc.  And trust me, if you are lucky enough to set your feet on Scottish soil, you will absolutely want to see those.  There are probably ten to fifteen castles throughout the country that are extremely popular with tourists and for good reason-they are stinkin’ awesome!  But I must confess.  As much as I love and appreciate the castles that are well trodden, I am a huge sucker for the ruins.  The quiet, melancholy ones that time has all but forgotten.

Meet Newark Castle.

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