Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Waiting

Whisky. Uisga Beatha. Water of Life.

By law, Scotch (that is, whisky without the ‘e’) must be aged in oak barrels in Scotland for a minimum of three years. Most premium distillers, however, mature their whisky for much longer (8, 10, 12, 15 years, etc.). Many of the casks that are used to age Scotch are imported from America and Europe and have previously held wine, bourbon, port, and sherry. Each barrel lends its own distinctive flavors and color to the finished product. It is a long process, but believe me, for the distillers and those of us who reap the benefits of their labor…

Stacked whisky barrels in a warehouse.
Stacked whisky barrels in an old warehouse.

…it is worth waiting for.

A glass of whisky next to green stonecrop.

To be a part of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, click here.  Thank you, Amy, for this week’s challenge!

Cheers!

Cocktail Recipe – Professor’s Poisoned Apple

Halloween and all of its festivities are nearly upon us, so I thought it would be fun to find a Halloween-themed cocktail made with whisky. Notice, that’s whisky without the ‘e’ (Scotch). Because as much as I adore bourbon, I’m pretty much all about Scotland here!

I discovered this particular cocktail recipe on a site called Gastronom. The web site is hosted by an American couple named Jay and Leah, who love all things cocktails. Some of their recipes are pretty interesting! It’s a great resource if you are looking to try something a bit different. And that’s exactly what today’s recipe is. The “Professor’s Poisoned Apple” calls for Laphroaig, an Islay whisky that is made by drying malted barley over a peat fire, giving it its distinctive smoky taste of the island. The Scotch is combined with Amaretto, cranberry juice, apple cider, and bitters, creating a genuinely unique new flavor that isn’t dominated by any one of its ingredients. It is, for sure, an eclectic blend of tastes, but those tastes go surprisingly well together to create a flavor of fall.

Jay and Leah suggest the optional addition of dry ice as a way to really create a fun, atmospheric experience. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any on quick notice, but it would be neat to try it one day. You can see what it looks like by clicking the embedded link above. Here is the recipe. Enjoy!


 

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Whisky Meets Tequila-The Transatlantic Romance Continues

Whisky meets tequila. Yep, it was another serendipitous find for me and Mr. C. By the way, you can thank him for the silly title. 😉

Thanks to our mutual craving for margaritas one recent Saturday, we accidentally stumbled upon this latest offering from Don Julio while buying our tequila.

A bottle of a limited edition of Don Julio tequila that was aged in a cask that previously held Lagavulin whisky.

A little over a year ago, Don Julio released their first limited edition; a Reposado finished in barrels that had previously held Buchanan’s blended Scotch. I wrote about it here. Well, if I was excited about that one, then this year’s edition has me positively giddy. Why you ask? One word.

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Scotch Cocktail Recipe-Full Scottish & Cheers to 2 Years!

So tomorrow happens to be my 2 year blogging anniversary. Hooray me!! To celebrate, I am trying a new Scotch cocktail recipe called a Full Scottish. It seems rather appropriate, actually, given the focus of my blog.

I found this recipe on The Glenlivet’s web site; however, I imagine it would be good with any other Speyside (or perhaps Highland) single malt of your choice.  The Glenlivet recommends using their 15-year-old Scotch for this recipe.  Mr. C says that’s an awfully good Scotch to use in a cocktail recipe, but I told him we’re going to do it anyway!  It’s a sacrifice I must make.  🙂

Enjoy.


Full Scottish Recipe

Ingredients: 

50 ml The Glenlivet 15-year-old

20 ml/4 tsp lemon juice

15 ml/3 tsp white/ruby port ( I used Sandeman Founder’s Reserve Ruby Port)

5 ml/1 tsp simple syrup

15 ml/3 tsp orange marmalade

Scotch cocktail recipe ingredients.

To make:

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Honey and Whisky Cake Recipe-My New Favorite

Hi, friends. As I begin to write this cake recipe post, I have Eileen Barton’s cute 1950 hit song stuck in my head – “If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake.” Go ahead. YouTube it. I dare you. 😀

Today I want to share a recipe for Honey and Whisky Cake. I got the recipe from a little book I purchased a few weeks ago in Scotland. This cake is quick and easy to make and delicious. It’s moist, not overly sweet, and the grated orange rind is a wonderful addition. My new favorite!

Enjoy!

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Rob Roy-A Delicious Whisky Cocktail

Hi guys! I hope you have had a great weekend. I have been nursing a crappy ear infection. But alas, it’s been a good excuse to catch some extra z’s, lay around the house in my bathrobe, binge some television, and sip a little whisk(e)y. Always look on the sunny side of life, my friends!

In keeping with said whisk(e)y, today, we are going to make a whisky cocktail called a Rob Roy. Mr. C and I happen to LOVE Manhattans, as we have been on quite the bourbon kick lately (thus the reason I included the ‘e’ in the spelling of whiskey). Our newfound appreciation for bourbon began last fall when we visited Lexington, Kentucky, and toured three different distilleries.

Named after the 17th-century Scottish outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor, a Rob Roy is essentially a Manhattan. But instead of bourbon – or if you’re a purist, rye whiskey – it is made with a blended Scotch (whisky without the ‘e’). We initially wanted to make today’s recipe with Dimple Pinch, a smooth, non-peaty blend that is perfectly suited for mixed drinks. Unfortunately, Mr. C couldn’t find any, and the liquor store he went to was thin on blends. So instead, he decided to try one we have never had. It’s called Monkey Shoulder. Great name, right? It describes itself as “blended in small batches of three fine Speyside single malts, then married to achieve a smoother, richer taste.”

A bottle of Monkey Shoulder.

Robert Roy MacGregor (1671-1734) was a marauder in the Highlands of Scotland. After falling out with the Duke of Montrose, Roy ran a racket, whereby he earned a living stealing cattle and then extorting money from farmers to ‘protect’ them from thieves. His name was made even more famous by writer Walter Scott when he published his novel “Rob Roy” in 1817.

Decorative monkeys on a bottle of Monkey Shoulder blended whisky.

Based on its description, I think Monkey Shoulder sounds promising. Let’s see if the taste is as inventive as that fun name!

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Whisk(e)y…With an ‘E’

Hi, friends.  I’m giddy you stopped by!  I hope everyone is enjoying a lovely weekend.

As promised a couple of weeks ago, I have a special guest blogger here today.  Technically this was supposed to happen last weekend, but unfortunately, my guest was in a car accident that totaled his beautiful convertible. Ugh!  No worries, though, because aside from a few cuts and a little soreness, he’s feeling A-OK.  And that’s a very good thing because I happen to be in love with this guy!

Readers, today I’m turning things over to my sweet husband, Mr. C, who is going to share with you a little bit about the whisk(e)y education we received on our recent anniversary getaway.  Enjoy.

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Whisky Ball Recipe

Last week I mentioned that I had a special guest blogger lined up for this week, but due to unforeseen circumstances (tell you about it later), I had to mix things up a bit. So…we are going to cook today instead!

If you stopped by last week, then you know that Mr. C and I recently took a trip to Lexington, Kentucky, to celebrate our anniversary. During our visit, we toured three different bourbon distilleries (Buffalo Trace, Maker’s Mark, and Woodford Reserve). Each of the tours concluded with a tasting, and they gave us a bourbon ball made with whiskey from that particular distillery. All were delicious, but Mr. C and I both agreed that the bourbon balls at Buffalo Trace were AH-MAZING. I did a little poking around on the internet when we got back and found a recipe that is supposed to be very similar to the candies invented in 1938 by Ruth Booe, the founder of Rebecca Ruth Candy Factory in Frankfort, KY. That is the candy company that today makes the bourbon balls for purchase at Buffalo Trace. Perfect!

Because I write a blog about Scotland and not about Kentucky, I decided to give these a try using Scotch rather than bourbon (whisky with a “y” as opposed to whiskey with an “ey”). Mr. C suggested that I use BenRiach 10-year-old (a Speyside Scotch), which I discovered was an excellent choice given that it is aged in ex-bourbon and ex-sherry casks, lending it the perfect sweet flavor.

Who’s ready to cook?  Let’s give it a go!

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Whisky Meets Tequila-A Transatlantic Romance

This morning while Mr. C was at the liquor store buying tequila to make margaritas tonight, he stumbled upon a newly stocked item – Don Julio Tequila-Reposado, Double Cask.

Whisky and tequila meet in the box of Don Julio Reposado Limited Edition.

Did you catch what the box says? “Finished in casks used in the making of Buchanan’s blended Scotch whisky.” Whisky meets tequila. Holy cow! “What’s that,” you ask? Why yes, of course, he bought a bottle, silly!

If you are familiar with the Don Julio brand, you know that their tequilas are top-shelf. Definitely not the stuff of college drinking games. No. Don Julio tequilas are like a fine wine or a premium Scotch. They are meant for sipping (emphasis on sipping), savoring, and appreciating all of their excellent qualities. In fact, Don Julio tequilas are so exceptional that you can enjoy them neat. No mixer required.

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