Lens-Artists Challenge #75: Nostalgic

Hello all! I hope you are having/have had a terrific Tuesday.

This week’s photo challenge comes from Tina. She has encouraged us to depict something that evokes nostalgia. For my offering, I have chosen to highlight a few photos taken at Lauriston Castle in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Last November, I wrote a post showcasing the beautiful Edwardian interior of Lauriston Castle and also included a little bit about its history. If you are interested in taking a look, you can get to it by clicking here. The photos from that post are in color, but for today’s purposes, I have had a little fun transforming a few of those photos into a more vintage look.

The castle was left to the city of Edinburgh upon the death of its last owner, Mrs. Reid, in 1926 and the interior remains today exactly as it was on the day she passed. I hope these photos evoke a sense of nostalgia and give life to how Lauriston would have looked in photos in Mrs. Reid’s day.

Thanks for stopping by, friends. If you would like to participate in this week’s challenge, please click here.

Take care!

Recipe: Bridies

Hi, friends!

Mr. C and I had some big fun in the kitchen today. We made our first bridies! I must admit, I was a bit intimidated by the endeavor, mainly because I have zero experience in pastry making. I am a capable cook, but Mr. C is the real chef in the family. Thankfully with the efforts of the two of us, they turned out great!

What is a bridie? A bridie (also referred to as a Forfar Bridie because it is said to have originated in Forfar, Angus, Scotland) is a ‘D’ shaped pastry with a savory beef and onion filling. A bridie is similar to an English pasty (short ‘a’), however, it is made sans potatoes and has a lighter, flakier crust.

Introduced in the 1800’s, there are two stories of how bridies came to be. One story claims that they were originally made for weddings (the bride’s meal) and that the ‘D’ or horseshoe shape was meant for good luck. Another story says that they were made by a lady named Margaret Bridie who would sell them at market in Forfar. Either way, they are delicious!


Bridies

(makes 4-5 pies)

(Adapted/combined from King Arthur Flour and Outlander Kitchen by Theresa Carle-Sanders.)

Filling Ingredients:

1 Tbsp. (14g) vegetable oil (*instead of vegetable oil, we chose to use 1 Tbsp. of bacon grease that we reserved from our breakfast)

1¼ lbs. (567g) ground hamburger/minced beef 

1 C (142g) minced onion

1¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp dried thyme

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1/3 C (32g) old-fashioned rolled oats

1/2 C (113g) beef broth (*we used beef stock reserved from a slow-cooked beef brisket that we previously made)

salt and pepper to taste

Pastry Ingredients:

3 C (361g) unbleached all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp salt

6 Tbsp (85g) unsalted butter

3/4 C (170g) water

Egg Wash:

1 large egg, beaten with 1 Tbsp water

Instructions:

To make the filling: Place oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the meat and onion and cook until the meat is cooked through and the onions are translucent. Stir in the Worcestershire sauce, thyme, nutmeg, oats, beef stock, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook for 3 more minutes or until most of the liquid has cooked away.  Remove from the heat and set aside to cool while you make the pastry.

To make the pastry:  In a large bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.  Make a well in the center.  Bring the butter and water to a boil in a small saucepan, then pour into the well in the flour mixture.  Stir together until the mixture is evenly moistened and still warm, but cool enough to handle comfortably.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface.  Knead the dough until it’s the consistency of Play-Doh. If the dough feels dry, make a well in the center and add 1 tsp. of water at a time until the consistency is right.  When ready, cut off a manageable chunk of the dough and roll to about 1/4″ thick.  Use a small plate or saucer as a template, cut out six 6″ or 7″ circles of dough, gathering the scraps and re-rolling as necessary.  

To assemble: Place the dough circles on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Arrange the beef mixture on the top half of the circles, about 1/2″ from the edge. Fold in half. Press around the edges to seal. Use your fingers to crimp the edges. Brush the tops with the egg wash.

Cut a small slit in the crust to vent and bake at 400° for 25-30 minutes.

Serve and enjoy!

Do you have a bridie recipe that you would like to share or special tips and hints that you use? Let me know in the comments!

Have a great week!

Cheers,

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #74: Abstract

This week Patti has challenged us to “break the rules and go beyond the traditional realistic image of an object, scene, or element” to post a picture of something abstract. I immediately thought of these photos, taken at Elgin Cathedral in Elgin, Moray in the northeast part of Scotland.

This is the beautiful vaulted ceiling and column in the cathedral’s Chapter House, an octagonal room in which cathedral clergy met daily to discuss business. The Chapter House was built in the early 13th century and remodeled in the late 1400’s.

Have a great week, everyone!

If you would like to join in on the weekly challenges, click here.

Happy Thanksgiving!

May love and laughter light your days

and warm your heart and home.

May good and faithful friends be yours

wherever you may roam.

May peace and plenty bless your world

with joy that long endures.

May all life’s passing seasons

bring the best to you and yours.

 

-old Irish blessing

My fellow American friends, I wish you the happiest Thanksgiving!  May your day spent with family and friends be a blessed and joyous one.

xo,

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #73: Cold

This week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge comes from Tina. She has challenged us to depict cold.

I chose this photo of Loch Tay in Scotland. Fifteen miles long, a mile wide, and around five-hundred feet deep, Loch Tay lies in the valley between the villages of Kenmore and Killin. The area has a rich history from the Iron Age when ancient people lived on the loch on man-made islands called crannogs.

Beautiful at any time of the year, there is something extra lovely about Loch Tay when clothed in white.

Loch Tay covered in snow.

Wishing each of you a happy week!

xo,

If you would like to join in the fun of the weekly challenges, click here.

Kinloss Abbey

It was late afternoon and Mr. C and I were on our way back to our cabin in Farr, tired from a full day of exploring sites in the Moray region of Scotland. We were driving on the B9089 through the village of Kinloss when I suddenly spotted some intriguing looking ruins out my window. I shouldn’t have been surprised – it is Scotland after all. You can’t drive five miles without coming upon some treasure or another (you think I jest). I had Mr. C turn the car around and though we were already worn out from our long day of adventuring, we ended up spending another hour or so happily exploring what turned out to be the amazing ruins of Kinloss Abbey.

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72: Waiting

Whisky. Uisga Beatha. Water of Life.

By law, Scotch (that is, whisky without the ‘e’) must be aged in oak barrels in Scotland for a minimum of three years. Most premium distillers, however, mature their whisky for much longer (8, 10, 12, 15 years, etc.). Many of the casks that are used to age Scotch are imported from America and Europe and have previously held wine, bourbon, port, and sherry. Each cask lends its own distinctive flavors and color to the finished product. It is indeed a long process, but believe me, for the distillers and those of us who reap the benefits of their labor…

…it is worth waiting for.

To be a part of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, click here.  Thank you, Amy, for this week’s challenge!

Cheers!

“The Fall of the Leaf” by Robert Burns

“The Fall of the Leaf” by Robert Burns

The lazy mist hangs from the brow of the hill, 
Concealing the course of the dark-winding rill; 
How languid the scenes, late so sprightly, appear! 
As Autumn to Winter resigns the pale year. 

The forests are leafless, the meadows are brown, 
And all the gay foppery of summer is flown: 
Apart let me wander, apart let me muse, 
How quick Time is flying, how keen Fate pursues! 

How long I have liv’d-but how much liv’d in vain, 
How little of life’s scanty span may remain, 
What aspects old Time in his progress has worn, 
What ties cruel Fate, in my bosom has torn. 

How foolish, or worse, till our summit is gain’d! 
And downward, how weaken’d, how darken’d, how pain’d! 
Life is not worth having with all it can give- 
For something beyond it poor man sure must live. 

Wishing you a restful Sunday and a happy week ahead.

Inchdrewer Castle

Welcome back, friends. Happy Wednesday to you!

It is utterly frigid here in Virginia this morning. With our weather so wintry (and so early in the season!), I thought today would be a great time to revisit the beautiful afternoon this past May when Mr. C and I visited Inchdrewer Castle. I think of all the days of this past year, we must have been there on the most splendid of them all.

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Get to Know Me Better – 15 Random Things About Me

Hello and happy November! Golly, is it really November already? A few days ago, I took this photo through the windshield of my car as I drove through my neighborhood. Every autumn I am so awestruck by the beauty that abounds. Don’t you just love fall, y’all?

I want to do something completely different today. I think this is going to be fun. I normally write about all things Scottish, but on this gorgeous Monday, I am going to share with you fifteen totally random things about me. It’s a “get to know me better” post. Let’s have fun!

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